A Custom Designed and Printed Motor Mount

A Custom Designed and Printed Motor Mount

Zagi flying wings have been a favorite for over two decades now. Since taking ownership of Zagi in 2016, we’ve loved hearing about your ventures. More recently, we’ve heard how some of you have altered your Zagi to fit a need or to enhance it. Here are a few “Zagi hacks” that we’ve learned about more recently.

I first happened across Jeff Perrigo’s 3D-printed Zagi motor mount on Thingiverse when I was searching for Zagi parts, so I reached out to him. Jeff said that he bought his first Zagi at an RC swap meet two years ago. It’s a Zagi 400 that worked well until he unfortunately over-propped it and burnt out the motor. The wing uses an inrunner motor, but he decided to switch to an outrunner motor (which isn’t supplied), so he decided to design and print his own 3D-printed motor mount to outfit a 7-inch prop.

inrunner motor

Zagi Brushless Outrunner Motor Mount

“This required that I cut the elevons back to make some room. Next, I designed a mount to hold an HD camera (Xiaomi Yi) and a smaller camera for flying FPV (first-person view). I cut out an area on the nose to install the camera mount. I flew it this way for a while, but after a hard crash into a tree I broke the wing almost in half, from front to back,” he said.

While he was repairing, he decided to embed the battery in the wing and laser cut his own battery tray from a piece of plywood. He cut out the foam and mounted the battery tray horizontally behind the camera mount. He also added several carbon fiber spars for support and strength. In flying it, he realized he needed to add some carbon spars for strength in the front for the nose to keep the camera steady. He’s also considering making it a long range wing for mountain flying.

Currently, he flies his Zagi at an abandoned golf course near his home in Snohomish, Washington. “The trees are spread out just enough to make some really interesting courses. We typically get four or five people together and chase each other through the trees,” Jeff said. “I really enjoy flying the Zagi. It is not as fast or nimble as some of my other wings, but for such an old airframe, it keeps up better than people expect. It is also easy to fly, and it glides really well.”

Watch his Zagi fly over Lake Whatcom in Washington:

Flying at Wellington:

Chasing Juggernaut and two Scythe wings:

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